Bibliography and Index of the Sirenia and Desmostylia  


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"Domning, Daryl Paul"

Domning, Daryl Paul: SEE ALSO Aranda-Manteca et al., 1994; Bajpai & Domning, 1997; Barnes et al., 1985; Bradley et al., 1983; Brandt, J. F., 1974; Buffrénil et al., 1990; Bullock et al., 1977, 1980, 1981; Delaney et al., 1985; Donovan et al., 1990; Farmer et al., 1979a, 1979b; Garcia-Rodriguez et al., 1998; Gingerich et al., 1994; Goodwin et al., 1998; Haley, D., 1980; Hoffmann & Domning (eds.), 1998; Inuzuka et al., 1995; Ketten et al., 1992; Marine Mammal Commission, 1986; Muizon & Domning, 1985; Packard, Rathbun et al., 1984; Pervesler et al., 2000; Ray & Domning, 1986; Ray et al., 1994; Savage et al., 1994; Shikama & Domning, 1970; Takahashi et al., 1979, 1986; Thewissen & Domning, 1992; Toledo & Domning, 1991; Williams & Domning, 2004; Appendix 1, _Sirenews_. (detail)
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Shikama, Tokio; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1970
Pliocene Sirenia in Japan.
Trans. Proc. Pal. Soc. Japan (2)80: 390-396. 3 figs. Pl. 44. Dec. 20, 1970 (read June 27, 1970).
–Japanese summ. Reports a rib of Hydrodamalis sp. from the Late Pliocene Lower Sarumaru Formation, Do-ai, Nagano Prefecture, Honshu. This was the first record of a fossil sir. in Japan. Briefly reviews other records of Pacific hydrodamalines, and inadvertently coins the new combination M[etaxytherium]. vanderhoofi (395).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1971a
Sirenians as guide fossils in West Coast Late Tertiary correlation - a prospectus. [Abstr.]
Geol. Soc. Amer. Abstrs. With Programs (Cordilleran Section, Riverside, Calif.) 3(2): 110-111. Feb. 1971 (read Mar. 27, 1971).
–Reviews known Pacific history of hydrodamalines and suggests their possible stratigraphic utility. The new combination Metaxytherium allisoni is used (110), and the Subfamily Hydrodamalinae is expanded in usage to include Miocene forms.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1971b
Sirenian evolution in the North Pacific and the origin of Steller's sea cow.
Proc. 7th Ann. Conf. Biol. Sonar & Diving Mammals (Menlo Park, Calif., Stanford Research Institute): 217-220. Read Oct. 24, 1970.
–Proposes a hypothetical history of hydrodamaline evolution in response to cooling of climate. Suggests that the extermination of Hydrodamalis by aborigines influenced the development of North Pacific aboriginal whaling.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1972a
Sirenians and desmostylians in West Coast Miocene stratigraphy.
Proc. Pacif. Coast Mioc. Biostrat. Symp. (47th Ann. Pacif. Sect. Convention, Soc. Econ. Paleont. Mineral., Bakersfield, Calif., Mar. 9-10, 1972): 146-149. 1 fig. Read Mar. 10, 1972.
–Abstr.: Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. Bull. 57(2): 432, Feb. 1973. Summarizes geographic and stratigraphic distributions of North Pacific desmostylians and sirs., discusses their use in stratigraphy, and points out a discrepancy in southern California geological mapping.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1972b
Steller's sea cow and the origin of North Pacific aboriginal whaling.
Syesis 5: 187-189.
–Suggests that prehistoric human predation on Hydrodamalis not only led to the latter's extermination on the Asian and American mainlands, but also aided in the development of whaling technology by North Pacific natives.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1974
Fossil seacows of the Southeast.
Rocky Echoes (Jackson, Miss., Mississippi Gem & Mineral Soc.) 14(7): 7-9. Jan. 1974.
–Pop. acc. of the stratigraphic and geographic distribution of fossil sirs. in the southeastern USA and Caribbean.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1975
Ecology and evolution of North Pacific sirenians. [Abstr.]
Amer. Zool. 15(3): 824. Summer 1975 (read to Soc. Syst. Zool., Aug. 21, 1975).
–Abstr. of Domning (1977b). Proposes that Metaxytherium allisoni, a bottom-feeder, died out due to a decline of North Pacific seagrasses and competition with desmostylians; a surface-feeding dugongid lineage, in contrast, gave rise to the kelp-eating Hydrodamalis.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Frye, Fredric L. (detail)
   
1975
Pathology of two fossil sea cows (Mammalia: Sirenia).
PaleoBios (Berkeley, Univ. Calif. Mus. Pal.) No. 18: 1-4. 2 pls. July 10, 1975.
–Reprinted in a bound vol. of the early issues of PaleoBios, 1980. Describes fractures, osteomyelitis, and ossifying spondylosis in Metaxytherium jordani and osteitis deformans or osteitis fibrosa in Hydrodamalis n.sp. from California.
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Bullock, Theodore H.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Best, Robin Christopher (detail)
   
1977
Hearing in a manatee (Sirenia: Trichechus inunguis). [Abstr.]
Proc. 2nd Conf. Biol. Marine Mamms. (San Diego, Calif.): 72. Dec. 1977.
–Abstr. of Bullock et al. (1980).
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Magor, Diana Marion (detail)
   
1977
Taxa de substituição horizontal de dentes no peixe-boi.
Acta Amazonica 7(3): 435-438. Sept. 1977.
–Preliminary report on tooth replacement in T. inunguis. Toothrow movement, initiated by weaning, is on the order of 1 mm/month in captive animals and is directly proportional to intake of solid food.
  The cover of this issue depicts Domning bottle-feeding a manatee calf.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1977a
Observations on the myology of Dugong dugon (Müller).
Smithson. Contrib. Zool. No. 226: iii + 57. 2 tabs. 54 figs. Jan. 5, 1977.
–The skeletal muscles of a female Palauan dugong are described, illustrated (with maps of muscle attachments), and compared with other published descriptions of manatee and dugong musculature. Body measurements and data on skin thickness are also given, and the functional anatomy of the facial region, jaws, spine, and flippers is discussed. (For corrigenda, see Domning, 1978a: 56.) In overall body form, dugongs appear to be more specialized and efficient swimmers than manatees. The chief myological differences are in the shoulder region.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1977b
An ecological model for Late Tertiary sirenian evolution in the North Pacific Ocean.
Syst. Zool. 25(4): 352-362. 5 figs. "Dec. 1976" (publ. Feb. 8, 1977; read Aug. 21, 1975).
–Abstr.: Domning (1975). Outlines a set of principles and postulates for interpreting sir. paleoecology; briefly describes the phyletic history of North Pacific sirs.; and summarizes the interpretations presented in detail in Domning (1978b) regarding their diet, functional anatomy, possible competition with desmostylians, evolutionary pattern, and the role of North Pacific paleogeographic and climatic change in their evolution.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1977c
Criar filhotes de peixe-boi pode ser um mal negócio para você e para o filhote de peixe-boi.
A Crítica (Manaus, Brasil), Aug. 7, 1977, Vida, p. 3. 3 figs.
–Feature in the Sunday magazine supplement of a Manaus newspaper. Condemns the practice, by wealthy citizens of Manaus, of buying orphaned T. inunguis calves as "pets", and describes the intensive efforts required to keep such animals alive and the history of such efforts at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1978a
The myology of the Amazonian manatee, Trichechus inunguis (Natterer) (Mammalia: Sirenia).
Acta Amazonica 8(2), Supl. 1: 1-81. 8 tabs. 50 figs. June 1978.
–Portuguese summ. The skeletal muscles of several young Amazonian manatees are described, illustrated (with maps of muscle attachments), and compared with those of other sirs. The functional anatomy of the bristles of the upper lip, the nostrils, jaws, neck, and forelimb is discussed (57-71); a vector analysis of jaw mechanics is presented (57-67), as are data on muscle weights (67) and corrigenda to Domning, 1977a (56). Interspecific myological differences among manatees seem to be confined to the mm. rectus capitis lateralis and biceps brachii. The jaw apparatus is dominated by a very large temporalis muscle, which produces unresolved forces that are resisted at a joint between the mandible and the strong pterygoid process. T. inunguis is more specialized for surface-feeding and swimming than T. manatus.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1978b
Sirenian evolution in the North Pacific Ocean.
Univ. Calif. Publ. Geol. Sci. 118: xi + 176. 27 tabs. 37 figs. 18 pls. Sept. 8, 1978.
–Summarizes all available information on sirs. from the North Pacific basin and describes all known sir. fossils from that region, listing (in an appendix) their locality data and associated faunas, and interprets their paleoecology, functional anatomy, and phylogeny. The contents of the former dugongid subfamily Halianassinae are redistributed between the Halitheriinae and the expanded and redefined Hydrodamalinae. Seven sir. species are recognized in the North Pacific, including one halitheriine (Dioplotherium allisoni, n.comb.; Middle Miocene) and six hydrodamalines: Dusisiren, n.gen., D. reinharti, n.sp. (Middle Miocene), D. Sp. B (new; Late Miocene), D. jordani, n.comb. (Late Miocene-Early Pliocene), D. Sp. D (new; Early Pliocene), Hydrodamalis cuestae, n.sp. (Middle-Late Pliocene), and H. gigas (Pleistocene-Recent). The hydrodamalines are interpreted to constitute a single, unbranching evolutionary lineage which progressively adapted to colder and more exposed habitats and a diet of kelp. Possible competitive interactions between North Pacific sirs. and desmostylians are also discussed. Reviews data on the historical distribution of H. gigas, and concludes that it was in fact exterminated ca. A.D. 1768. Includes (163-165) translations by George V. Shkurkin of two Russian eyewitness accounts of Hydrodamalis-hunting on Bering Island (by P. Yakovlev, 1754-55, and S. Cherepanov, 1759-60) which had not previously been published in English.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:BE76A8A9-7924-4C97-A099-0BD35D26A269
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1978c
Sirenia. Chap. 28 in: V. J. Maglio & H. B. S. Cooke (eds.), Evolution of African mammals.
Cambridge & London, Harvard Univ. Press (xiii + 641 pp.): 573-581. 1 fig.
–Reviews the sir. fossil record, emphasizing occurrences in Africa and Madagascar, and presents a simplified phylogeny of sirs. For update, see Domning et al., 2010.
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Takahashi, Shizuo; Domning, Daryl Paul; Saito, Tsunemasa (detail)
   
1979
[On the discovery of a fossil sea cow from Ohe town, Yamagata Prefecture.] [Abstr.]
Abstrs. 86th Ann. Meeting, Geol. Soc. Japan (Akita, Japan): 228.
–In Japanese. Reports a skeleton of Dusisiren n.sp. from the Late Miocene Hashigami Sandstone Member of the Hongo Formation, Ohe, Yamagata Prefecture, Japan. See also Takahashi et al. (1986).
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Farmer, Martha; Weber, Roy E.; Bonaventura, Joseph; Best, Robin Christopher; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1979a
Functional properties of hemoglobin and whole blood in an aquatic mammal, the Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis).
Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 62A: 231-238. 6 figs.
–Abstr.: Farmer & Bonaventura, 1977. Portuguese transl.: Farmer et al. (1979b). Reports that the blood has a low hematocrit and oxygen capacity compared to that of other diving mammals; the hemoglobin has low sensitivity to temperature, tends to dissociate into dimers, and has other exceptional characteristics.
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Farmer, Martha; Weber, Roy E.; Bonaventura, Joseph; Best, Robin Christopher; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1979b
Propriedades funcionais de hemoglobina e sangue completo em um mamífero aquático, o peixe-boi amazônico (Trichechus inunguis).
Acta Amazonica 8(4), Supl.: 311-321. 6 figs. Dec. 1978 (publ. 1979).
–Engl. summ. Portuguese transl. of Farmer et al. (1979a).
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Bullock, Theodore H.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Best, Robin Christopher (detail)
   
1980
Evoked brain potentials demonstrate hearing in a manatee (Trichechus inunguis).
Jour. Mamm. 61(1): 130-133. 1 fig. Feb. 20, 1980.
–Portuguese transl.: Bullock et al. (1981). Abstr.: Bullock et al. (1977). Reports that the most effective frequency was circa 3 kHz. Compares the hearing range with the range of vocalizations in other sirs. The most sensitive region of the head was found to be over the zygomatic process of the squamosal.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1980
Feeding position preference in manatees (Trichechus).
Jour. Mamm. 61(3): 544-547. 2 tabs. Aug. 20, 1980.
–Experiments comparing feeding behavior of captive T. inunguis and T. m. latirostris showed that both prefer to feed as low as possible in the water column. This is interpreted to mean that all sirs., due to their subterminal mouths and regardless of rostral deflection, find it more energetically efficient to feed lower in the water column. This in turn suggests a possible selective value for evolutionary changes in rostral deflection.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Myrick, Albert C., Jr. (detail)
   
1980
Tetracycline marking and the possible layering rate of bone in an Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis). In: W. F. Perrin & A. C. Myrick, Jr. (eds.), Age determination of toothed whales and sirenians.
Repts. Internatl. Whaling Comm., _ Special Issue 3: 203-207. 3 figs.
–The successful marking of a rib, using a 7.1-8.5 mg/kg dosage of Terramycin, suggests a periosteal bone deposition rate of one layer per year. Layering in ribs and mandibles of T. manatus is also discussed.
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Bullock, Theodore H.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Best, Robin Christopher (detail)
   
1981
Potências cerebrais através do estímulo acústico (AEP) mostram a audição no peixe-boi (Sirenia: Trichechus inunguis).
Acta Amazonica 11(3): 423-427. 1 fig. Sept. 1981.
–Portuguese transl. of Bullock et al. (1980).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1981a
Distribution and status of manatees Trichechus spp. near the mouth of the Amazon River, Brazil.
Biol. Conserv. 19(2): 85-97. 3 figs. Jan. 1981.
–Concludes that the range of T. manatus in Brazil is disjunct (north and south of the Amazon), with T. inunguis occurring in the Amazon estuaries; the ranges of the two species are nearly or entirely mutually exclusive. Also provides notes on food plants, hunting and utilization, and conservation of manatees in the region.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1981b
Manatees of the Amazon.
Sea Frontiers 27(1): 18-23. 3 figs. Jan.-Feb. 1981.
–Notice: Oro-Bio (Mag. of Dental Res. Inst., Univ. of California, Los Angeles) 3(1): 1-2, 1 fig., Fall 1981. Pop. acc. of research on T. inunguis at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA), Manaus, Brazil.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1981c
Manati Steller, 1774 and Trichechus exunguis (Natterer in Diesing, 1839) (Mammalia, Sirenia): proposal to place these names on the Official Indexes of Rejected and Invalid Names in Zoology.
Bull. Zool. Nomencl. 38(2): 130-133. Apr. 30, 1981.
–Also proposes placing Hydrodamalis Retzius, 1794 and H. gigas (Zimmermann, 1780) on the Official Lists of valid names. These proposals were accepted; see Opinion 1320 (R.V. Melville, 1985).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1981d
Sea cows and sea grasses.
Paleobiology 7(4): 417-420. Dec. 17, 1981.
–Discusses the use of the sir. fossil record in constructing hypotheses about the evolution of marine and freshwater floras in the Caribbean, North Pacific, South America, and Mediterranean.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Morgan, Gary Scott; Ray, Clayton Edward (detail)
   
1982
North American Eocene sea cows (Mammalia: Sirenia).
Smithson. Contrib. Paleobiol. No. 52: iii + 69. 3 tabs. 34 figs. Sept. 3, 1982.
–Briefly reviews the worldwide Eocene sir. record, and reports in detail on the 22 known New World Eocene localities (1-17). New specimens from Florida (18-39) and North Carolina (39-59) are described, compared with other sirs., and referred to Protosiren sp. New records of Pleistocene Trichechus manatus from the Waccasassa River, Florida (18), and of Protosiren n.sp. from the Late Eocene of Egypt (55-56, 59), are also reported. The primitive sir. dental formula is confirmed to have been 3.1.5.3, and the significance of this for eutherian phylogeny is pointed out (59-60). The pan-Tethyan distribution of Eocene sirs. and its biostratigraphic potential, the possible sequence of sir. adaptive radiations (60-61), and the probable seagrass diet of Eocene sirs. (61-62) are discussed; concludes that the distribution of fossil sirs. is a more reliable guide to the past presence of seagrasses than are the distributions of Foraminifera or other organisms.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Rice, Dale W.; Shoshani, Jeheskel; Hoffmann, Robert S. (detail)
   
1982
Order Sirenia. In: J. H. Honacki, K. E. Kinman, & J. W. Koeppl (eds.), Mammal species of the world: a taxonomic and geographic reference.
Lawrence (Kansas), Allen Press & Assoc. Systematics Colls. (ix + 694 pp.): 305-306.
–Ed. 2: see D. E. Wilson (1993). Gives very brief nomenclatural and distributional notes on the Recent sirs., citing their current conservation status under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and the U.S. Endangered Species Act, and their International Species Inventory System (ISIS) numbers.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1982a
Commercial exploitation of manatees Trichechus in Brazil c. 1785-1973.
Biol. Conserv. 22(2): 101-126. 12 tabs. 1 fig. Feb. 1982.
–Compilation and analysis of published statistics on commerce in meat, lard, and hides of T. inunguis. Records of meat-hunting of T. manatus in Alagoas (in 1959) and Bahia (in 1964) are also noted.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1982b
Evolution of manatees: a speculative history.
Jour. Paleont. 56(3): 599-619. 9 figs. May 1982.
–Reviews all records of fossil trichechids and possible trichechids, and proposes an evolutionary scenario for the family, based on Tertiary changes in South American drainage patterns and the evolution of floating meadows. Reports new material of: Potamosiren sp., Miocene, Colombia (601-602); Ribodon limbatus, Miocene, Argentina (602-603); Ribodon sp., ?Pliocene, North Carolina (604); Trichechus sp., Plio-Pleistocene, Brazil (603-604) and Florida (604-605) and Pleistocene, Louisiana (605). Illustrates for the first time Funderburg's (1960) Pleistocene Trichechus from North Carolina (605). Discusses the homology of cheek teeth in Trichechus (607-608), the importance of a gramineous diet in the manatees' evolution of horizontal tooth replacement (609-612), possible trichechid-dugongid competition in the Caribbean (613-614), and the present adaptive status of manatees (615-616). Suggests that root hypsodonty in Dugong is recently evolved (614). Concludes that trichechids probably evolved in South America from a protosirenid ancestor, and adapted there to a diet of freshwater grasses by the evolution of supernumerary molars.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1982c
Fossil Sirenia from the Sahabi Formation.
Garyounis Scientific Bull. (Benghazi) Special Issue No. 4: 29-32. 2 figs.
–Reports Metaxytherium serresii from the Early Pliocene Sahabi Formation, Libya, and suggests that this species was dwarfed due to suboptimal conditions for seagrasses in the post-Messinian Mediterranean.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1983
Marching teeth of the manatee.
Nat. Hist. (New York) 92(5): 8, 10-11. 1 fig. May 1983.
–Pop. acc. of tooth replacement, dental adaptation, and evolution of manatees and their possible competition with extinct Caribbean dugongids.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Deméré, Thomas A. (detail)
   
1984
New material of Hydrodamalis cuestae (Mammalia: Dugongidae) from the Miocene and Pliocene of San Diego County, California.
Trans. San Diego Soc. Nat. Hist. 20(12): 169-188. 4 tabs. 7 figs. Nov. 20, 1984.
–Reviews the geology and biostratigraphy of the San Mateo and San Diego Formations, and describes new cranial and postcranial specimens of H. cuestae from both; confirms the supposed abnormality of the holotype and the large size of the species in the southern part of its range.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Hayek, Lee-Ann C. (detail)
   
1984
Horizontal tooth replacement in the Amazonian manatee (Trichechus inunguis).
Mammalia (Paris) 48(1): 105-127. 7 tabs. 7 figs. https://doi.org/10.1515/mamm.1984.48.1.105 Mar. 5, 1984.
–French summ. Analysis of tooth-loss data from captive manatees indicates rates of tooth movement on the order of 1 mm/month. The rates vary directly with food (especially grass) consumption, and are probably controlled by the mechanical stress of chewing. The replacement process seems adapted to a diet that is both tough and abrasive, and does not work as well when (as in Florida manatees) these two factors are decoupled.
 
 
Packard, Jane M.; Rathbun, Galen B.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Best, Robin Christopher; Anderson, Paul K.; O'Shea, Thomas J. (detail)
   
1984
Sea cows and manatees. In: D. W. Macdonald (ed.), The encyclopedia of mammals.
New York, Facts on File Publs.: 292-303. 15 figs.
–Repr. in: K. Banister & A. Campbell (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Aquatic Life. New York, Facts on File Publs.: 340-349. 12 figs. Dec. 16, 1985.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1984a
Sea cow discovery.
Nature (London) 308(5959): 500. Apr. 5, 1984.
–Comments on V. Rich (1983), pointing out the potential importance of a supposedly associated Hydrodamalis skeleton found on Bering Island in view of the incomplete knowledge of the species' osteology.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1984b
Sea cows of the Chesapeake Bay.
Bugeye Times (Calvert Marine Museum, Solomons, Maryland) 9(1): 5-6. 1 fig. Spring 1984.
–Pop. acc. of Metaxytherium calvertense and other fossil and Recent sirs. recorded from the Chesapeake area.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1984c
Fossil sirenians from the Pamunkey River, Virginia. In: L. W. Ward & K. Krafft (eds.), Stratigraphy and paleontology of the outcropping Tertiary beds in the Pamunkey River region, central Virginia coastal plain.
Atlantic Coastal Plain Geol. Assoc. (Guidebook, 1984 Field Trip, Oct. 6-7, 1984): 224-225. 1 pl.
–Reports sir. remains resembling Metaxytherium calvertense from the Middle Miocene Calvert Formation on the Pamunkey River.
 
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Barnes, Lawrence G.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Ray, Clayton Edward (detail)
   
1985
Status of studies on fossil marine mammals.
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 1(1): 15-53. 1 tab. 9 figs. Jan. 1985.
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Muizon, Christian de; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1985
The first records of fossil sirenians in the southeastern Pacific Ocean.
Bull. Mus. Natl. Hist. Nat. (Paris) (4)7, Sect. C, no. 3: 189-213. 2 tabs. 14 figs.
–French & Spanish summs. Reports skulls of Metaxytherium calvertense from the Early to Middle Miocene Montera Formation (190-206), and a rib of an undescribed dugongid from the Early Pliocene Pisco Formation (206-209), Peru. Compares these specimens with other sirs., and discusses (209-211) their biogeographic and phylogenetic implications. Also reports the recent entry of T. manatus into the Pacific via the Panama Canal, based on a personal communication from G. G. Montgomery (209).
  The rib was reidentified as that of an aquatic sloth (Thalassocnus sp.) by Amson et al. (2015).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1985a
Potential biochronologic utility of European sirenians. [Abstr.]
Abstrs. VIIIth Congress, Regional Committee on Mediterranean Neogene Stratigraphy, Symposium on European Late Cenozoic Mineral Resources (Budapest, 15-22 Sept. 1985): 183.
–Points out that the European species of Halitherium and Metaxytherium appear to form an Oligocene-Pliocene sequence of chronospecies having potential use in stratigraphic correlation.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1985b
Habitat protection: the only hope.
Save the Manatee Club News (Florida Dept. Nat. Resources & Florida Audubon Soc.), Dec. 1985: [2].
–Essay on the need to protect manatee habitat in Florida.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Hayek, Lee-Ann C. (detail)
   
1986
Interspecific and intraspecific morphological variation in manatees (Sirenia: Trichechus).
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 2(2): 87-144. 7 tabs. 4 figs. . https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-7692.1986.tb00034.x Apr. 1986.
–Discusses the external and internal characteristics of the living manatee species, with an extensive statistical analysis of measurements and qualitative features of the skull and mandible. No significant sexual dimorphism was found (97). Salient ontogenetic changes in the skull are briefly noted (97-99). The subspecies T. m. manatus and T. m. latirostris are found to be morphologically distinguishable and taxonomically valid; the vernacular name "Antillean manatee" is proposed for the former (125). Cold weather in the northern Gulf of Mexico and strong currents in the Straits of Florida are suggested as causes of the apparent genetic isolation of Florida manatees. Alleged subspecies of T. senegalensis are considered to be baseless (126). Detailed diagnoses are given for all the species and subspecies (126-130). The functional significance of diagnostic cranial differences is discussed (130-131). Cladistic analysis suggests that T. manatus and T. senegalensis are each other's closest relatives (132-136); the senegalensis-like features of a Pleistocene skull from South Carolina illustrate the general primitiveness of the African species.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Ray, Clayton Edward (detail)
   
1986
The earliest sirenian (Mammalia: Dugongidae) from the eastern Pacific Ocean.
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 2(4): 263-276. 1 tab. 6 figs. Oct. 1986.
–A partial skull and mandible from the Early Miocene Nye Mudstone in Oregon is referred to Halitheriinae gen. et sp. indet. The possible entry of sirs. into the North Pacific in the Late Oligocene and Early Miocene is discussed in terms of climate and paleogeography (273-274).
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Ray, Clayton Edward; McKenna, Malcolm Carnegie (detail)
   
1986
Two new Oligocene desmostylians and a discussion of tethytherian systematics.
Smithson. Contrib. Paleobiol. No. 59: iii + 56. 23 figs. May 28, 1986.
–Describes Behemotops, n.gen. (6), B. proteus (6) and B. emlongi (23), n.spp. from Washington and Oregon, respectively, as the most primitive known desmostylians. Reviews at length the history of desmostylian and tethytherian systematics, and presents a cladistic analysis of the Tethytheria (36-38), concluding that the Desmostylia and Proboscidea are sister-groups whose next closest relatives are the Sirenia. Moeritherium, Anthracobune, and Minchenella are also discussed in detail (38-45); the latter is considered a possible ancestor of both Proboscidea and Desmostylia. Desmostylians are regarded as herbivores that fed intertidally and subtidally (47-48).
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:39E15956-FB66-41FB-A440-29DC05DD83DA
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Ray, Clayton Edward; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1986
Manatees and genocide.
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 2(1): 77-78. Jan. 1986.
–Repr.: Amer. Cetacean Soc., Puget Sound Chapter Newsletter, July-Aug. 1989: 8-9. Letter to the editor, arguing that the problem of preserving Florida manatees is a critical challenge for marine mammal conservation in the U.S.
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Takahashi, Shizuo; Domning, Daryl Paul; Saito, Tsunemasa (detail)
   
1986
Dusisiren dewana, n. sp. (Mammalia: Sirenia), a new ancestor of Steller's sea cow from the Upper Miocene of Yamagata Prefecture, northeastern Japan.
Trans. Proc. Pal. Soc. Japan (n.s.) No. 141: 296-321. 12 tabs. 15 figs. Pls. 53-62. https://doi.org/10.14825/prpsj1951.1986.141296 Apr. 30, 1986.
–Japanese summ. Abstrs.: Takahashi et al. (1979); East Asian Tertiary/Quaternary Newsletter No. 9: 44, 1989. Describes the skull and skeleton of Dusisiren dewana and compares it with D. jordani, Hydrodamalis cuestae, and H. gigas. It is considered phyletically intermediate between the former two and is 9.0-10.4 Ma old. (See Takahashi et al., 1983 for more details on the discovery of this specimen, the geology of the locality, and associated fossils.) Also summarizes other fossil sir. occurrences in Japan, and suggests that the tooth of "Dugong" reported by Inuzuka et al. (1980) may instead represent Paleoparadoxia (317).
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:FC2490D9-F183-467D-86E8-E68D4176B45F
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Thomas, Herbert (detail)
   
1987
Metaxytherium serresii (Mammalia: Sirenia) from the Early Pliocene of Libya and France: a reevaluation of its morphology, phyletic position, and biostratigraphic and paleoecological significance. In: N. T. Boaz, A. El-Arnauti, A. W. Gaziry, J. de Heinzelin, & D. D. Boaz (eds.), Neogene paleontology and geology of Sahabi.
New York, Alan R. Liss (xv + 401 pp.): 205-232. 12 tabs. 13 figs.
–Arabic, French, and German summs. Reviews the history of the name Metaxytherium serresii (206-207); summarizes the record of Metaxytherium in Europe (207-209); describes the material of M. serresii from Sahabi, Libya (209-223); presents a cladistic analysis of European Halitherium and Metaxytherium (223-228); and reviews the stratigraphic context of M. serresii at Montpellier, France (228-229). Concludes that H. christolii, M. krahuletzi, M. medium, M. serresii, and M. forestii form a single lineage, probably derived from H. schinzii. The small size of M. serresii is attributed to dwarfing caused by poor nutrition, due in turn to reduced diversity, quality, and/or quantity of seagrasses in the post-Messinian Mediterranean.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1987a
Sea cow family reunion.
Nat. Hist. (New York) 96(4): 64, 66-71. 2 figs. Apr. 1987.
–Pop. acc. of the history of study, paleoecology, and evolution of the Sirenia of the North Pacific Ocean.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1987b
Halianassa studeri von Meyer, 1838 (Mammalia, Sirenia): proposed designation of a neotype, and proposed conservation of Halitherium Kaup, 1838 by designation of a type species.
Bull. Zool. Nomencl. 44(2): 122-125. June 1987.
–In order to suppress the name Halianassa studeri, the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature is asked to designate as its neotype the holotype of Pugmeodon schinzii, and to designate P. schinzii as type species of Halitherium, thereby making Halianassa studeri a junior objective synonym of Halitherium schinzii. The formal rejection of the names Halianassa and studeri is requested, as well as a ruling that the correct original spelling of Halytherium be deemed to be Halitherium. These proposals were accepted; see Opinion 1535 (ICZN, 1989).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1987c
How long have manatees been in Florida?
Save the Manatee Club News (Florida Dept. Nat. Resources & Florida Audubon Soc.), Aug. 1987: [1-2].
–Brief pop. acc. of the sir. fossil record in Florida, showing that (contrary to a current rumor) manatees were not recently introduced into the state. See also Domning (2005).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1988
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. I. Metaxytherium floridanum Hay, 1922.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 8(4): 395-426. 12 tabs. 12 figs. Dec. 14, 1988.
–Describes the history of study of fossil sirs. from the Bone Valley area, Polk and Hillsborough Cos., Florida; the geology and age of the Bone Valley deposits; the osteology of a large sample of M. floridanum from Bone Valley and a few specimens from elsewhere in Florida; and the phylogenetic relationships of the species. M. floridanum is considered to be Middle-Late Miocene in age, and a senior synonym of M. ossivallense. Reports of M. calvertense and "Hesperosiren" in the Bone Valley Formation actually pertain to M. floridanum.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1989a
Kelp evolution: a comment.
Paleobiology 15(1): 53-56. "Winter 1989" (mailed June 13, 1989).
–Comments on Estes & Steinberg (1988), arguing that kelps radiated prior to the Middle Miocene and were subject to intense marine-mammal herbivory from the Late Oligocene on. See also Estes & Steinberg (1989).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1989b
Fossil sirenians from the Suwannee River, Florida and Georgia. In: G.S. Morgan (ed.), Miocene paleontology and stratigraphy of the Suwannee River basin of north Florida and south Georgia.
Southeastern Geol. Soc. Guidebook No. 30: 54-60. 2 figs. Oct. 7, 1989.
–Describes the discoveries, relationships, and probable feeding habits of "Halitherium" olseni, Dioplotherium manigaulti, and Metaxytherium sp. found in the Miocene of the Suwannee River basin. See also G. S. Morgan (1989).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1989c
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. II. Dioplotherium manigaulti Cope, 1883.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 9(4): 415-428. 2 tabs. 6 figs. Dec. 19, 1989.
–Describes the history of study of fossil sirs. from the South Carolina phosphate beds; the age of beds in South Carolina and Florida yielding Dioplotherium; the osteology of available specimens of D. manigaulti, including a skull from the Lower Miocene of Florida; and the cladistic relationships of the species, which is formally referred to the Rytiodontinae together with Rytiodus and "Halitherium" olseni. Rytiodontines are hypothesized to have fed primarily on large seagrass rhizomes, and a similar adaptation is suggested for the ancestors of Dugong dugon.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1989d
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. III. Xenosiren yucateca, gen. et sp. nov.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 9(4): 429-437. 1 tab. 7 figs. Dec. 19, 1989.
–Describes a partial skull from the Upper Miocene or Lower Pliocene of Yucatan, Mexico; it is considered a rytiodontine and a direct descendant of Dioplotherium. Its cranial specializations are interpreted as adaptations for uprooting seagrass rhizomes using both jaws and tusks.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:DC4F2A71-A983-481D-B064-64381E78A7C8
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Buffrénil, Vivian De; Ricqlès, Armand de; Ray, Clayton Edward; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1990
Bone histology of the ribs of the archaeocetes (Mammalia: Cetacea).
Jour. Vert. Pal. 10(4): 455-466. 4 figs. Dec. 20, 1990.
–Compares the histology and functional significance of pachyostosis in sirs. with that in archaeocetes, where nearly identical morphological conditions occur (455, 463-465).
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Donovan, Stephen K.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Garcia, Frank A.; Dixon, Harold L. (detail)
   
1990
A bone bed in the Eocene of Jamaica.
Jour. Paleont. 64(4): 660-662. 1 tab. 3 figs. "July 1990" (publ. Sept. 1990).
–Describes an exposure of the early Middle Eocene Chapelton Formation at Dump, near Christiana, Manchester Parish, which yielded a new specimen of Prorastomus sirenoides as well as other fossil vertebrates. This specimen, a partial skeleton, was the first specimen of Prorastomus collected in situ.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1990a
Sirenian rhizivory studies. In: L. W. Lefebvre & J. A. Powell, Jr., Manatee grazing impacts on seagrasses in Hobe Sound and Jupiter Sound in southeast Florida during the winter of 1988-89.
NTIS Document No. PB 90-271883 (vi + 36): 34-36.
–Describes observations and experiments conducted to determine how thoroughly manatees can excavate and remove seagrass rhizomes, and how effective tusks of extinct dugongids might have been for this purpose. Results of experiments on the latter topic were published by Domning & Beatty (2007).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1990b
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. IV. Corystosiren varguezi, gen. et sp. nov.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 10(3): 361-371. 1 tab. 4 figs. Sept. 20, 1990.
–Describes a skull from the Early Pliocene of Yucatan, and skull fragments and tusks from possibly correlative deposits in Florida. The new form is considered a rytiodontine and possible sister taxon of Rytiodus.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Buffrénil, Vivian de (detail)
   
1991
Hydrostasis in the Sirenia: quantitative data and functional interpretations.
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 7(4): 331-368. 5 tabs. 18 figs. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1748-7692.1991.tb00111.x Oct. 1991.
–Analyzes the distribution of skeletal mass in T. m. latirostris and the positions of the centers of gravity and buoyancy in T. inunguis, concluding that increased volume and density of bones (= "pachyosteosclerosis", a term introduced here) do indeed serve in sirs. as ballast to maintain horizontal trim and neutral buoyancy. The design and position of the lungs also seem to serve this purpose. Selection for maintenance of trim and maximization of turning moments of the flippers may help account, respectively, for loss of hind limbs and shortening of the neck. The gross anatomy of a sir. (T. inunguis) is illustrated in serial cross sections for the first time. Summarizes the distribution of pachyosteosclerosis in various fossil sirs., and concludes that this condition is fully adaptive and in no sense "pathological".
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Toledo, Peter Mann De; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1991
Fossil Sirenia (Mammalia: Dugongidae) from the Pirabas Formation (Early Miocene), northern Brazil.
Bol. Museu Paraense Emílio Goeldi, Sér. Ciênc. da Terra 1(2): 119-146. 3 tabs. 12 figs. "1989" [publ. 1991].
–Portuguese summ. Describes the first complete fossil sir. skull from South America (Dioplotherium cf. allisoni), as well as cranial fragments of cf. Rytiodus (the first possible New World record for this genus) and cf. Metaxytherium, all from Burdigalian-age deposits on the coast of Pará.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1991a
Sexual and ontogenetic variation in the pelvic bones of Dugong dugon (Sirenia).
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 7(3): 311-316. 2 figs. July 1991 (mailed Aug. 15, 1991).
–Describes variation in innominate bones of 41 male and 29 female dugongs from Queensland, and presents a key for assigning such bones to broad categories of sex, age, and sexual maturity.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1991b
A new genus for Halitherium olseni Reinhart, 1976 (Mammalia: Sirenia).
Jour. Vert. Pal. 11(3): 398. Sept. 30, 1991.
–Names and diagnoses the new genus Crenatosiren, and creates the new combination C. olseni.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:DCCD0F6A-B948-439D-9AC4-043D80102E96
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1991c
Why save the manatee? In: J. E. Reynolds, III & D. K. Odell, Manatees and dugongs.
New York, Facts on File (xiv + 192): 167-173. Oct. 1991.
–An essay based on ideas originally outlined by Domning in Sirenews No. 3: 1-4 (April 1985). Lists and discusses a graded series of reasons for protecting manatees and other endangered species and their habitats.
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Ketten, Darlene R.; Odell, Daniel Keith; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1992
Structure, function, and adaptation of the manatee ear. In: J. Thomas, R. Kastelein & A. Supin (eds.), Marine mammal sensory systems.
New York, Plenum Press: 77-95. 2 tabs. 8 figs.
–Rev.: D.E. Gaskin, Mar. Mamm. Sci. 10(3): 384-387, July 1994. Describes the anatomy and (using CT scans) location in the head of ear structures in Florida manatees. Calls attention to the possible role of the inflated zygomatic process in sound conduction. Concludes that the manatee has an essentially aquatic but non-acute, low-frequency ear with a relatively narrow range, poor sensitivity, and poor localization ability. Suggests that this could account for inability to avoid collisions with powerboats. Also notes hypertrophy of the chorda tympani, suggesting that taste is a very important sensory modality for manatees.
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Patton, Geoffrey W.; Gerstein, Edmund R.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Sutherland, Michael; Perinetti, Robert (detail)
   
1992
An annotated bibliography of sirenian hearing.
Mote Marine Laboratory Tech. Rept. No. 272: 1-61. Oct. 1992.
–Includes citations of 98 references on sirenian hearing. Can be downloaded from: http://home.ncifcrf.gov/research/bja/GWPubs/
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Thewissen, Johannes G. M.; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1992
The role of phenacodontids in the origin of the modern orders of ungulate mammals.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 12(4): 494-504. 2 tabs. 2 figs. Dec. 15, 1992.
–Concludes that the mirorder Pantomesaxonia (including Sirenia, Desmostylia, Proboscidea, Hyracoidea, and Perissodactyla) and the order Phenacodonta are sister groups together making up the superorder Paenungulata, but the relationships within the Pantomesaxonia remain unresolved.
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Domning, Daryl Paul; Clark, James M. (detail)
   
1993
Jamaican Tertiary marine Vertebrata. In: R. M. Wright & E. Robinson (eds.), Biostratigraphy of Jamaica.
Geol. Soc. Amer. Mem. 182: 413-415. Dec. 1993.
–Reviews the occurrences of Prorastomus sirenoides in Early and Middle Eocene rocks of Jamaica (414).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1993a
[Letter to the editor.]
Nat. Hist. 102(9): 2. "Sept. 1993" (mailed Aug. 1993).
–Points out that Steller's sea cow and not the blaauwbock was the first "large-bodied mammalian species" to become extinct in historic times, contrary to a statement by S. J. Gould.
 
 
Aranda-Manteca, Francisco Javier; Domning, Daryl Paul; Barnes, Lawrence G. (detail)
   
1994
A new Middle Miocene sirenian of the genus Metaxytherium from Baja California and California: relationships and paleobiogeographic implications. In: A. Berta & T. A. Deméré (eds.), Contributions in marine mammal paleontology honoring Frank C. Whitmore, Jr.
Proc. San Diego Soc. Nat. Hist. 29: 191-204. 3 tabs. 13 figs. May 1, 1994.
–Revs.: S. A. McLeod, Jour. Vert. Pal. 16(1): 183-185, Mar. 19, 1996; J. E. Heyning, Mar. Mamm. Sci. 12(2): 326-329, "Apr. 1996" (publ. Mar. 29, 1996). Spanish summ. Describes the new species Metaxytherium arctodites, and interprets it as structurally ancestral to the Hydrodamalinae. Also places Hesperosiren in the synonymy of Metaxytherium, and synonymizes M. calvertense with M. crataegense (new combination).
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:9DED9347-0159-4EE2-9185-3C0C01C30EC4
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Gingerich, Philip D. (detail)
   
1994
Protosiren smithae, new species (Mammalia, Sirenia), from the late Middle Eocene of Wadi Hitan, Egypt.
Contr. Mus. Pal. Univ. Michigan 29(3): 69-87. 3 tabs. 11 figs. Nov. 30, 1994.
–urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:ECD2ED1E-6AAD-4691-B33A-FC40E818E9A4
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Gingerich, Philip D.; Simons, Elwyn L.; Ankel-Simons, Friderun A. (detail)
   
1994
A new Early Oligocene dugongid (Mammalia, Sirenia) from Fayum Province, Egypt.
Contr. Mus. Pal. Univ. Michigan 29(4): 89-108. 3 tabs. 7 figs. Nov. 30, 1994.
–Describes Eosiren imenti, n.sp.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:37EE7A1C-99F8-444A-B9FF-92E51FD773A7
 
 
Gingerich, Philip D.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Blane, Caroline E.; Uhen, Mark David (detail)
   
1994
Cranial morphology of Protosiren fraasi (Mammalia, Sirenia) from the Middle Eocene of Egypt: a new study using computed tomography.
Contr. Mus. Pal. Univ. Michigan 29(2): 41-67. 2 tabs. 8 figs. Nov. 30, 1994.
 
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Ray, Clayton Edward; Domning, Daryl Paul; McKenna, Malcolm Carnegie (detail)
   
1994
A new specimen of Behemotops proteus (Mammalia: Desmostylia) from the marine Oligocene of Washington. In: A. Berta & T. A. Deméré (eds.), Contributions in marine mammal paleontology honoring Frank C. Whitmore, Jr.
Proc. San Diego Soc. Nat. Hist. 29: 205-222. 1 tab. 15 figs. May 1, 1994.
–Revs.: S. A. McLeod, Jour. Vert. Pal. 16(1): 183-185, Mar. 19, 1996; J. E. Heyning, Mar. Mamm. Sci. 12(2): 326-329, "Apr. 1996" (publ. Mar. 29, 1996). A new specimen including both upper and lower teeth, from the middle or upper Oligocene, confirms the close similarity of Behemotops to Eocene anthracobunids of Asia. B. emlongi is synonymized with B. proteus, and the dentition of the latter is reinterpreted.
 
 
Savage, Robert Joseph Gay; Domning, Daryl Paul; Thewissen, Johannes G. M. (detail)
   
1994
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. V. The most primitive known sirenian, Prorastomus sirenoides Owen, 1855.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 14(3): 427-449. 3 tabs. 12 figs. https://doi.org/10.1080/02724634.1994.10011569 Sept. 7, 1994.
–Italian transl.: https://www.mumat.it/gpt/notizie/.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1994a
West Indian tuskers.
Nat. Hist. (New York) 103(4): 72-73. 1 fig. Apr. 1994.
–Errata: Nat. Hist. 103(5): 6, May 1994. Pop. acc. of fossil dugongines and other sirs. in the Caribbean and their implications for the paleoecology and evolution of seagrass communities.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1994b
A phylogenetic analysis of the Sirenia. In: A. Berta & T. A. Deméré (eds.), Contributions in marine mammal paleontology honoring Frank C. Whitmore, Jr.
Proc. San Diego Soc. Nat. Hist. 29: 177-189. 2 tabs. 4 figs. May 1, 1994.
–Revs.: S. A. McLeod, Jour. Vert. Pal. 16(1): 183-185, Mar. 19, 1996; J. E. Heyning, Mar. Mamm. Sci. 12(2): 326-329, "Apr. 1996" (publ. Mar. 29, 1996). Presents the results of a cladistic analysis of 36 species and subspecies of sirs. using cranial and dental characters. Formally refers the subfamily Miosireninae to the Trichechidae, and introduces the name Trichechinae for the remaining trichechids. Dugong dugon is placed within the clade previously called the Rytiodontinae, and the senior name Dugonginae is extended to include this entire clade. A revised provisional classification of the Sirenia is presented.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:718B06CF-3876-4FEA-864A-AC940980DC2C
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1995
What do we know about the evolution of the dugong? In: Mermaid Symposium: First International Symposium on Dugong and Manatees. November 15-17, 1995, Toba, Mie, Japan. Abstracts.
Toba (Japan), Toba Aquarium: 23-24.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Furusawa, Hitoshi (detail)
   
1995
Summary of taxa and distribution of Sirenia in the North Pacific Ocean.
The Island Arc 3(4): 506-512. "Dec. 1994" (publ. Nov. 1995).
 
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Inuzuka, Norihisa; Domning, Daryl Paul; Ray, Clayton Edward (detail)
   
1995
Summary of taxa and morphological adaptations of the Desmostylia.
The Island Arc 3(4): 522-537. 5 tabs. 11 figs. "Dec. 1994" (publ. Nov. 1995).
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1996a
Bibliography and index of the Sirenia and Desmostylia.
Smithson. Contrib. Paleobiol. No. 80: iii + 611. Frontisp. July 25, 1996.
–The first publication of the present database. Lists approximately 4,590 titles alphabetically by author; many entries annotated. Covers the neobiology, paleobiology, and ethnobiology of the Sirenia and Desmostylia, 1494-1994. The index employs 1,059 subject headings and cross references, including all Linnean names and combinations ever used for sirs. and desmostylians, plus names of all reported sir. food plants and parasites. More than 40% of the main entries are fully indexed, and many others are partially indexed, yielding over 13,950 index entries, most of which are themselves annotated and include page references. Six appendices list serial publications devoted to the Sirenia, additional sources for the history of sirenology and sir. conservation, and coins and postage stamps depicting sirs., and provide a classification and synonymy of the Sirenia and Desmostylia, a summary of the nomenclature of the Recent sirs., and an alphabetical list of species-group names of sirs. and desmostylians.
  Only original nomenclatural acts appearing for the first time in this publication are indexed here. These comprise new synonymies of Halitherium schinzii lareolensis Pilleri with H. schinzii (Kaup) (385), of Metaxytherium riveroi Varona with M. crataegense (Simpson) (386), of M. krahuletzi excelsum Pilleri with M. krahuletzi Depéret (386), of M. catalaunicum Pilleri with M. medium (Desmarest) (387), and of Prototherium solei Pilleri and P. montserratense Pilleri with "P." intermedium Bizzotto (388); also emendation of the spelling of "Metaxytherium" kachchhense Bajpai, Singh, and Singh (386).
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1996b
Common patterns of evolution among ungulates evolving into marine mammals: examples from Cetacea and Sirenia. (Abstr.) In: J. E. Repetski (ed.), Sixth North American Paleontological Convention Abstracts of Papers. Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. June 9-June 12, 1996.
Pal. Soc. Special Publ. No. 8: 105. Read June 12, 1996.
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Bajpai, Sunil; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1997
A new dugongine sirenian from the early Miocene of India.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 17(1): 219-228. 3 tabs. 6 figs. Apr. 16, 1997.
–Redescribes the holotype skull of Bharatisiren kachchhensis (Bajpai, Singh, and Singh, 1987), n.gen. n.comb., from the Khari Nadi Formation in Kachchh (Kutch). This skull is the best-preserved fossil sirenian specimen so far reported from the Indian Ocean region, and the first fossil from that region that is unequivocally referable to the Dugonginae. It is related cladistically to other dugongines as follows: (Crenatosiren(Dugong(Bharatisiren(other dugongines)))).
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:A8B55171-C7A7-4D66-A8B6-149166103E2E
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1997a
Sirenia. Chap. 23 in: R. F. Kay, R. H. Madden, R. L. Cifelli, & J. J. Flynn (eds.), Vertebrate paleontology in the Neotropics: the Miocene fauna of La Venta, Colombia.
Washington & London, Smithsonian Inst. Press (xv + 592): 383-391. 4 figs.
–Spanish summ. Describes new sir. specimens from the Middle Miocene of Colombia, referring all the La Venta specimens (including the holotype of Metaxytherium ortegense Kellogg, 1966) to Potamosiren magdalenensis Reinhart, 1951. A Late Miocene tooth from the Río Acre (Brazil-Peru border) described by Frailey (1986) is interpreted as a fourth lower deciduous premolar of Ribodon. Potamosiren is considered ancestral to all other trichechines, and its thick molar enamel is interpreted as an adaptation to eating soft but increasingly abrasive aquatic plants.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1997b
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. VI. Crenatosiren olseni (Reinhart, 1976).
Jour. Vert. Pal. 17(2): 397-412. 9 tabs. 9 figs. June 19, 1997.
–Redescribes the species on the basis of the holotype and new material from the Late Olig. of Florida and South and North Carolina. It is regarded as the most primitive member of the Dugonginae and the sister group of all other known dugongines. This subfamily evidently arose in the West Atlantic-Caribbean region during the Oligocene.
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Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1997c
Marine mammals. In: F. F. Steininger, S. Iaccarino, & F. Cati (eds.), In search of the Paleogene/Neogene boundary. Part 3: The global stratotype section and point. The GSSP for the base of the Neogene (the Paleogene/Neogene boundary).
Giornale di Geologia (3)58(1/2): 177-180.
–Briefly discusses the biostratigraphic utility of the lineages of Cetacea, Pinnipedia, Sirenia, and Desmostylia that are known to have ranged across the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Considers the fossil records of these taxa to be insufficiently known for them to be used for more than crude stratigraphic correlations.
 
 
Garcia-Rodriguez, Angela I.; Bowen, B. W.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Mignucci Giannoni, Antonio A.; Marmontel, Miriam; Montoya Ospina, Ruby A.; Morales-Vela, Benjamín; Rudin, M.; Bonde, Robert K.; McGuire, Peter M. (detail)
   
1998
Phylogeography of the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus): how many populations and how many taxa?
Molecular Ecology 7(9): 1137-1149. 6 tabs. 2 figs. + cover photo. Sept. 1998.
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Goodwin, Mark B.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Lipps, Jere H.; Benjamini, Chaim (detail)
   
1998
The first record of an Eocene (Lutetian) marine mammal from Israel.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 18(4): 813-815. 2 figs. Dec. 28, 1998.
–Describes a caudal vertebra thought to represent either a prorastomid sirenian or a primitive cetacean, of probable early Middle Eocene age, collected from the Horsha Formation in the Negev Desert of Israel.
 
 
Hoffmann, Robert S.; Domning, Daryl Paul (eds.) (detail)
   
1998
Order of sea cows, or sirenians. In: R. S. Hoffmann (scientific ed.), Mammals of the Soviet Union. Volume II, Part 1a. Sirenia and Carnivora (sea cows; wolves and bears) by V. G. Heptner et al.
Washington, D.C., Smithsonian Inst. Libraries & National Science Foundation (xxii + 733 pp.): 3-49. 10 figs. 1 pl. Dec. 1998.
–Engl. transl. of Heptner & Naumov (eds.), 1967. Domning co-edited the sirenian chapter and provided some of the footnotes. The original sirenian chapter was written entirely by Heptner, and includes lengthy quotations from Steller (1751, 1753), translated into Russian by Heptner and here re-translated into English.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1999a
Fossils explained 24: Sirenians (seacows).
Geology Today 15(2): 75-79. 6 figs. Mar.-Apr. 1999.
–Gen. acc. of sirs. and their fossil record and evolutionary history.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1999b
Endangered species: the common denominator. Chap. 15 in: J. R. Twiss, Jr. & R. R. Reeves (eds.), Conservation and management of marine mammals.
Washington & London, Smithsonian Inst. Press (xi + 471 pp.): 332-341. Sept. 1999.
–Rev.: P. Shaughnessy, Mar. Mamm. Sci. 16(4): 843, Oct. 3, 2000.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1999c
Sirenians. In: R. Singer (ed.), Encyclopedia of paleontology. Vol. 2: M-Z.
Chicago & London, Fitzroy Dearborn Publs. (xiii + 689-1435): 1089-1090.
–Vol. 1 = pp. xix + 1-687. Short gen. acc. of sirs. and sir. evolution.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
1999d
Oligocene Sirenia of the Caribbean region. Appendix 1 (p. 29) in: H. L. Dixon & S. K. Donovan. Report of a field meeting to the area around Browns Town, parish of St. Ann, north-central Jamaica, 21st February, 1998.... with appendices by Daryl P. Domning and Paul D. Taylor.
Jour. Geol. Soc. Jamaica 33: 24-30.
–Summarizes the Oligocene sir. taxa recorded from the wider Caribbean region, and reports Late Olig. rib frags. from the Browns Town Formation.
x
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2000
The readaptation of Eocene sirenians to life in water. In: J.-M. Mazin, V. de Buffrénil, & P. Vignaud (eds.), Secondary adaptation of tetrapods to life in water.
Historical Biology (Special Issue) 14(1-2): 115-119. 1 fig.
–Describes in general terms the evolution of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic locomotor and diving adaptations in sirs., tracing the changes in gross body form exhibited by the four families and comparing them with convergent changes seen in contemporary cetaceans.
 
 
Pervesler, Peter; Roetzel, Reinhard; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2000
Lower Miocene seacows from Austria. In: Werner E. Piller, Gudrun Daxner-Höck, Daryl P. Domning, Holger C. Forke, Mathias Harzhauser, Bernhard Hubmann, Heinz A. Kollmann, Johanna Kovar-Eder, Leopold Krystyn, Doris Nagel, Peter Pervesler, Gernot Rabeder, Reinhard Roetzel, Diethard Sanders, & Herbert Summesberger, Palaeontological highlights of Austria (pp. 195-233; 1 tab., 28 figs.).
Mitt. Oesterr. Geol. Ges. 92: 213-215. Fig. 17. July 2000.
–This survey of noteworthy Austrian fossil occurrences, with lavish color illustrations, was produced on the occasion of an international geological congress to promote Vienna as the site of a future congress.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Pervesler, Peter (detail)
   
2001
The osteology and relationships of Metaxytherium krahuletzi Depéret, 1895 (Mammalia: Sirenia).
Abh. Senckenberg. Naturf. Ges. 553: 1-89. 19 tabs. Frontisp. 10 figs. 20 pls. Mar. 20, 2001.
–German summ.
 
 
Lefebvre, Lynn W.; Marmontel, Miriam; Reid, James P.; Rathbun, Galen B.; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2001
Status and biogeography of the West Indian manatee. Chap. 22 in: C.A. Woods & F.E. Sergile (eds.), Biogeography of the West Indies: patterns and perspectives. Ed. 2.
Boca Raton (Florida), CRC Press (582 pp.): 425-474. 2 tabs. 5 figs.
 
 
Portell, Roger W.; Donovan, Stephen K.; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2001
EarlyTertiary vertebrate fossils from Seven Rivers, Parish of St. James, Jamaica, and their biogeographical implications. Chap. 13 in: C.A. Woods & F.E. Sergile (eds.), Biogeography of the West Indies: patterns and perspectives. Ed. 2.
Boca Raton (Florida), CRC Press (582 pp.): 191-200. 4 figs.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2001a
Sirenians, seagrasses, and Cenozoic ecological change in the Caribbean. In: W. Miller III & S. E. Walker (eds.), Cenozoic palaeobiology: the last 65 million years of biotic stasis and change.
Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclim. Palaeoecol. (Special Issue) 166(1-2): 27-50. 2 figs. Feb. 1, 2001.
 
D
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2001b
Evolution of the Sirenia and Desmostylia. In: J.-M. Mazin & V. de Buffrénil (eds.), Secondary adaptation of tetrapods to life in water.
Munich, Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil (367 pp.): 151-168. 7 figs. Apr. 10, 2001?
–Review: B. L. Beatty, Jour. Vert. Pal. 23(2): 474-475, June 17, 2003.
x
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2001c
The earliest known fully quadrupedal sirenian.
Nature (London) 413(6856): 625-627. 2 figs. https://doi.org/10.1038/35098072 Oct. 11, 2001.
–Notices: New Scientist No. 2312: 27, Oct. 13, 2001; C. Reed, Geotimes 46(12): 8, 1 fig., Dec. 2001; C. Sagne, Universalia (Encyclopaedia Universalis France, Paris): 282, 1 fig., 2002; S. K. Donovan, Geology Today 18(2): 42, Mar./Apr. 2002; D. R. Prothero, Geotimes 47(7): 24, July 2002; Science Year (The World Book Annual Science Supplement) 2003: 245, 1 fig., 2002. Domning et al. Jour. Vert. Paleontology 21:45A, Jan. 2001 (abstr.).
  Describes Pezosiren portelli n.gen. n.sp., a prorastomid from the early Middle Eocene of Jamaica.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:873AB4C9-05D8-48A4-B93D-DBDD00B9FB5D
x
D
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2001d
Supposedly unique features of the desmostylian tibia are also found in other mammals.
Bull. Ashoro Mus. Pal. 2: 23-26. 1 tab. 1 fig. Mar. 30, 2001.
–Compares the tibiae of desmostylians with those of diverse fossil & Recent mammals, with regard to torsion of the tibia and tilt of the ankle joint relative to the axis of the tibial shaft. Concludes that desmostylians are not outside the range of variation in these characters seen in other mammals, and were probably adapted for slow ambulatory locomotion on land.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2001e
Sirenia (dugongs and manatees). In: Encyclopedia of Life Sciences.
London, Macmillan.
–Also published online in Aug. 2000; online version revised in March 2004, March 2005, and March 2012.
 
 
Anderson, Paul K.; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2002
Steller's sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas). In: W.F. Perrin, B. Würsig, & J.G.M. Thewissen (eds.), Encyclopedia of marine mammals.
San Diego, Academic Press (xxxviii + 1414): 1178-1181. 2 figs.
–Ed. 2 (2009): pp. 1103-1106. Ed. 3 (2018): pp. 935-938.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2002a
New "intermediate form" ties seacows firmly to land.
Repts. Natl. Center for Science Education (Berkeley, Cal.) 21(5-6): 38-42. 1 fig. "Sept.-Dec. 2001" [mailed Mar. 2002].
–Describes how Pezosiren portelli and other fossil sirs. demonstrate the fact of major evolutionary change in a group of mammals.
 
D
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2002b
The terrestrial posture of desmostylians. In: R.J. Emry (ed.), Cenozoic mammals of land and sea: tributes to the career of Clayton E. Ray.
Smithson. Contr. Paleobiol. 93: 99-111. 6 figs. Dec. 18, 2002.
 
D
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2002c
Desmostylia. In: W.F. Perrin, B. Würsig, & J.G.M. Thewissen (eds.), Encyclopedia of marine mammals.
San Diego, Academic Press (xxxviii + 1414): 319-322. 1 tab. 2 figs.
–Ed. 2 (2009): pp. 307-310.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2002d
Sirenian evolution. In: W.F. Perrin, B. Würsig, & J.G.M. Thewissen (eds.), Encyclopedia of marine mammals.
San Diego, Academic Press (xxxviii + 1414): 1083-1086. 3 figs.
–Ed. 2 (2009): pp. 1016-1019, 4 figs. Ed. 3 (2018): pp. 856-859, 4 figs.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2002e
Sirenia. In: McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology. Ed. 9.
Apr. 16, 2002.
x
 
Williams, Michael E.; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2004
Pleistocene or post-Pleistocene manatees in the Mississippi and Ohio River valleys.
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 20(1): 167-176. 1 tab. 3 figs. Jan. 13, 2004.
–Reports a rib and a radius-ulna of Trichechus manatus, of uncertain age, from southwestern Ohio and from the Mississippi River on the Arkansas-Mississippi border, respectively. Discusses records of other fossil or subfossil marine mammals from the Great Lakes region, and concludes that the manatees travelled upriver from the Gulf of Mexico, probably when the climate was warmer than today's.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2005
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. VII. Pleistocene Trichechus manatus Linnaeus, 1758.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 25(3): 685-701. 4 tabs. 8 figs. https://doi.org/10.1671/0272-4634(2005)025[0685:FSOTWA]2.0.CO;2 Sept. 30, 2005.
 
D
Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Domning, Daryl Paul; Tassy, Pascal (detail)
   
2005
Paenungulata (Sirenia, Proboscidea, Hyracoidea, and relatives). Chap. 7 in: K.D. Rose & J.D. Archibald (eds.), The rise of placental mammals: origins and relationships of the major extant clades.
Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Univ. Press (xi + 259): 84-105. 8 tabs. 9 figs.
 
 
Mattioli, Stefano; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2006
An annotated list of extant skeletal material of Steller's sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) (Sirenia: Dugongidae) from the Commander Islands.
Aquatic Mammals 32(3): 273-288. 5 tabs.
 
 
Carone, Giuseppe; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2007
Metaxytherium serresii (Mammalia: Sirenia): new pre-Pliocene record, and implications for Mediterranean paleoecology before and after the Messinian Salinity Crisis.
Bol. Soc. Pal. Ital. 46(1): 55-92. 16 tabs. 3 figs. 13 pls. Aug. 31, 2007.
 
D
Domning, Daryl Paul; Barnes, Lawrence G. (detail)
   
2007
A new name for the 'Stanford skeleton' of Paleoparadoxia (Mammalia, Desmostylia).
Jour. Vert. Pal. 27(3): 748-751. 2 figs. Sept. 12, 2007.
–Names Paleoparadoxia repenningi, n.sp.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:65BDBF6E-F0DA-49D6-B8E4-1F164C005B4E
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Beatty, Brian Lee (detail)
   
2007
Use of tusks in feeding by dugongid sirenians: observations and tests of hypotheses. In: J.S. Reidenberg & J.T. Laitman (eds.), Anatomical adaptations of aquatic mammals.
Anat. Rec. 290(6): 523-538. 1 tab. 6 figs. 10.1002/ar.20540 June 2007 (Mailed week of May 21, 2007).
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Thomason, James; Corbett, Debra G. (detail)
   
2007
Steller's sea cow in the Aleutian Islands.
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 23(4): 976-983. 2 figs. Oct. 2007.
–See also Turner, L.M. (2008).
 
 
Donovan, Stephen K.; Portell, Roger W.; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2007
Contrasting patterns and mechanisms of extinction during the Eocene-Oligocene transition in Jamaica. Chap. 8 in: W. Renema (ed.), Biogeography, time, and place: distributions, barriers, and islands.
Dordrecht, Springer (xii + 414): 247-273. 9 figs.
Pezosiren portelli and other sirs.; 248, 259-261, 265.
 
 
Bianucci, Giovanni; Carone, Giuseppe; Domning, Daryl Paul; Landini, Walter; Rook, Lorenzo; Sorbi, Silvia (detail)
   
2008
Peri-Messinian dwarfing in Mediterranean Metaxytherium (Mammalia: Sirenia): evidence of habitat degradation related to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. In: N.T. Boaz, A. El-Arnauti, P. Pavlakis, & M.J. Salem (eds.), Circum-Mediterranean geology and biotic evolution during the Neogene Period: the perspective from Libya.
Garyounis Scientific Bull., Special Issue 5: 145-157. 4 tabs. 1 fig.
–Summ.: [G. Carone], Bol. Gruppo Paleontologico Tropeano 10: 3-5, 5 figs., Dec. 2004.
 
D
Domning, Daryl Paul; Pyenson, Nicholas D. (detail)
   
2008
"Snagging" teeth and premolar homologies in Paleoparadoxiidae (Mammalia: Desmostylia).
Jour. Vert. Pal. 28(3): 923-927. 4 figs. Sept. 12, 2008.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Aguilera, Orangel A. (detail)
   
2008a
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. VIII. Nanosiren garciae, gen. et sp. nov. and Nanosiren sanchezi, sp. nov.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 28(2): 479-500. 8 tabs. 16 figs. June 12, 2008.
–urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:275238E1-E31A-4BEE-8404-C9D5D77B993E
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2008b
Sirenia. Chap. 36 in: C.M. Janis, G.F. Gunnell, & M.D. Uhen (eds.), Evolution of Tertiary mammals of North America. Vol. 2: Small mammals, xenarthrans, and marine mammals.
Cambridge, Cambridge Univ. Press (viii + 795): 629-638. 3 figs. June 12, 2008.
 
D
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2008c
Desmostylia. Chap. 37 in: C.M. Janis, G.F. Gunnell, & M.D. Uhen (eds.), Evolution of Tertiary mammals of North America. Vol. 2: Small mammals, xenarthrans, and marine mammals.
Cambridge, Cambridge Univ. Press (viii + 795): 639-644. 3 figs. June 12, 2008.
 
 
Bajpai, Sunil; Domning, Daryl Paul; Das, Debi P.; Mishra, Vijay P. (detail)
   
2009
A new middle Eocene sirenian (Mammalia, Protosirenidae) from India.
Neues Jb. Geol. Pal. Abh. 252(3): 257-267. 1 tab. 5 figs. 10.1127/0077-7749/2009/0252-0257 June 2009.
–Describes Ashokia antiqua n.gen.n.sp. from the early Middle Eoc. (Lutetian) Harudi Formation of Kutch, India.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:91FFF2B4-CD94-4B30-A06D-C0D84E151780
 
 
Clementz, Mark T.; Sorbi, Silvia; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2009
Evidence of Cenozoic environmental and ecological change from stable isotope analysis of sirenian remains from the Tethys-Mediterranean region.
Geology 37(4): 307-310. 2 figs. https://doi.org/10.1130/G25533A.1 Apr. 2009.
 
 
Bajpai, Sunil; Domning, Daryl Paul; Das, Debi P.; Vélez-Juarbe, Jorge; Mishra, Vijay P. (detail)
   
2010
A new fossil sirenian (Mammalia, Dugonginae) from the Miocene of India.
Neues Jb. Geol. Pal. Abh. 258(1): 39-50. 3 tabs. 6 figs. Published online June 2010.
–Describes Kutchisiren cylindrica, n.gen.n.sp., from the Lower Miocene (Aquitanian or Burdigalian) Khari Nadi Formation of Kutch, Gujarat, western India.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:B3B87E4E-AC64-44C4-8D49-69699BF123DF
 
 
Buffrénil, Vivian de; Canoville, Aurore; D'Anastasio, Ruggero; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2010
Evolution of sirenian pachyosteosclerosis, a model-case for the study of bone structure in aquatic tetrapods.
Jour. Mammalian Evolution 17: 101-120. 3 tabs. 9 figs. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10914-010-9130-1 Published online Feb. 26, 2010.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Zalmout, Iyad Saleh; Gingerich, Philip D. (detail)
   
2010
Sirenia. Chap. 14 in: L. Werdelin & W. J. Sanders (eds.), Cenozoic mammals of Africa.
Berkeley, Univ. of California Press (xxi + 986): 147-160. 1 tab. 5 figs.
–Updates Domning, 1978c.
 
 
Sarko, Diana K.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Marino, Lori; Reep, Roger Lyons (detail)
   
2010
Estimating body size of fossil sirenians.
Mar. Mamm. Sci. 26(4): 937-959. 4 tabs. 5 figs. Oct. 2010.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Sorbi, Silvia (detail)
   
2011
Rytiodus heali, sp. nov., a new sirenian (Mammalia: Dugonginae) from the Miocene of Libya.
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 31(6): 1338-1355. 1 tab. 13 figs. "Nov. 2011" (publ. online Nov. 8, 2011; mailed Dec. 29, 2011).
x
 
Appeltans, Ward; + 120 other authors including Domning, Daryl Paul; Self-Sullivan, Caryn (detail)
   
2012
The magnitude of global marine species diversity.
Current Biology 22(23): 2189-2202. 2 tabs. 3 figs. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2012.09.036 Dec. 4, 2012 (publ. online Nov. 15, 2012).
–Notice: Nature 491: 498, Nov. 22, 2012.
 Includes as Supplemental Information two tables and Supplemental Experimental Procedures (available online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2012.09.036).
 Sirenia mentioned on pp. 2195 and 2197, and in Supplemental Table S2.
 SUMMARY: Background: The question of how many marine species exist is important because it provides a metric for how much we do and do not know about life in the oceans. We have compiled the first register of the marine species of the world and used this baseline to estimate how many more species, partitioned among all major eukaryotic groups, may be discovered. Results: There are ~226,000 eukaryotic marine species described. More species were described in the past decade (~20,000) than in any previous one. The number of authors describing new species has been increasing at a faster rate than the number of new species described in the past six decades. We report that there are ~170,000 synonyms, that 58,000–72,000 species are collected but not yet described, and that 482,000–741,000 more species have yet to be sampled. Molecular methods may add tens of thousands of cryptic species. Thus, there may be 0.7–1.0 million marine species. Past rates of description of new species indicate there may be 0.5 ± 0.2 million marine species. On average 37% (median 31%) of species in over 100 recent field studies around the world might be new to science. Conclusions: Currently, between one-third and two-thirds of marine species may be undescribed, and previous estimates of there being well over one million marine species appear highly unlikely. More species than ever before are being described annually by an increasing number of authors. If the current trend continues, most species will be discovered this century.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2012
The early years of the Amazonian manatee project at INPA, Manaus, Brazil.
Aquatic Mammals 38(2): 204-222. 11 figs.
 
 
Hautier, Lionel; Sarr, Raphaël; Tabuce, Rodolphe; Lihoreau, Fabrice; Adnet, Sylvain; Domning, Daryl Paul; Samb, Momar; Hameh, Pierre Marwan (detail)
   
2012
First prorastomid sirenian from Senegal (western Africa) and the Old World origin of sea cows.
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 32(5): 1218-1222. 2 figs. https://doi.org/10.1080/02724634.2012.687421 Sept. 2012.
–Reports an isolated thoracic vertebra of an unidentified prorastomid from the Middle Eocene (Lutetian) Taïba Formation in Senegal.
 
 
Hines, Ellen M.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Aragones, Lemnuel V.; Marmontel, Miriam; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A.; Reynolds, John E., III (detail)
   
2012
The role of scientists in sirenian conservation in developing countries. Chap. 27 in: E. M. Hines et al. (eds.), Sirenian conservation: issues and strategies in developing countries (q.v.).
Gainesville, University Press of Florida (xiv + 326): 243-245.
 
 
Sorbi, Silvia; Domning, Daryl Paul; Vaiani, Stefano Claudio; Bianucci, Giovanni (detail)
   
2012
Metaxytherium subapenninum (Bruno, 1839) (Mammalia, Dugongidae), the latest sirenian of the Mediterranean Basin.
Jour. Vert. Paleo. 32(3): 686-707. 4 tabs. 12 figs. 3 appendix tabs. Supplementary Data at www.tandfonline.com/UJVP. https://doi.org/10.1080/02724634.2012.659100 May 2012.
 
 
Vélez-Juarbe, Jorge; Domning, Daryl Paul; Pyenson, Nicholas D. (detail)
   
2012
Iterative evolution of sympatric seacow (Dugongidae, Sirenia) assemblages during the past ~26 million years.
PLoS ONE 7(2): e31294. 8 pp. 1 tab. 3 figs. + 1 fig. in Supporting Information. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0031294. Feb. 3, 2012.
–Available online at: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0031294.
 ABSTRACT: Extant sirenians show allopatric distributions throughout most of their range. However, their fossil record shows evidence of multispecies communities throughout most of the past ~26 million years, in different oceanic basins. Morphological differences among co-occurring sirenian taxa suggest that resource partitioning played a role in structuring these communities. We examined body size and ecomorphological differences (e.g., rostral deflection and tusk morphology) among sirenian assemblages from the late Oligocene of Florida, early Miocene of India and early Pliocene of Mexico; each with three species of the family Dugongidae. Although overlapping in several ecomorphological traits, each assemblage showed at least one dominant trait in which coexisting species differed. Fossil sirenian occurrences occasionally are monotypic, but the assemblages analyzed herein show iterative evolution of multispecies communities, a phenomenon unparalleled in extant sirenian ecology. As primary consumers of seagrasses, these communities likely had a strong impact on past seagrass ecology and diversity, although the sparse fossil record of seagrasses limits direct comparisons. Nonetheless, our results provide robust support for previous suggestions that some sirenians in these extinct assemblages served as keystone species, controlling the dominance of climax seagrass species, permitting more taxonomically diverse seagrass beds (and sirenian communities) than many of those observed today.
 
 
Aragones, Lemnuel V.; Lawler, Ivan R.; Marsh, Helene D.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Hodgson, Amanda J. (detail)
   
2012a
The role of sirenians in aquatic ecosystems. Chap. 1 in: E. M. Hines et al. (eds.), Sirenian conservation: issues and strategies in developing countries (q.v.).
Gainesville, University Press of Florida (xiv + 326): 4-11. 2 tabs. 1 fig. 1 map.
–Includes a box essay by Domning (p. 6, "Rostral deflection in sirenians").
 
 
Carone, Giuseppe; Domning, Daryl Paul; Marra, Antonella Cinzia (detail)
   
2013
New finds of Metaxytherium serresii (Gervais, 1847) (Mammalia: Sirenia) from the Upper Miocene of Monte Poro (Calabria, Italy).
Bollettino della Società Paleontologica Italiana 52(3): 187-196. 3 tabs. 4 figs. Publ. online Dec. 30, 2013.
–Italian summ. Abstr.: Carone & Marra, 2012, Giornate di Paleontologia XII - Catania: 26.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2013
Order Sirenia – Dugongs, Manatees. In: J. Kingdon, D. Happold, M. Hoffmann, T. Butynski, M. Happold, & J. Kalina (eds.), Mammals of Africa. Volume I. Introductory Chapters and Afrotheria.
London, Bloomsbury Publishing: 201-202. 3 figs. Feb. 2013.
–Introduction to the sir. chapter; subsequent parts of the chapter (pp. 203-212) are by J. E. Reynolds III, H. Marsh, P. Dutton, and J. A. Powell, Jr. Illustrations include sketches by J. Kingdon.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Pervesler, Peter (detail)
   
2013
The sirenian Metaxytherium (Mammalia: Dugongidae) in the Badenian (Middle Miocene) of Central Europe.
Austrian Journal of Earth Sciences 105(3): 125-160. 10 tabs. 11 figs. "2012" (publ. Spring 2013).
–German summ.
 
 
Crerar, Lorelei D.; Crerar, Andrew P.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Parsons, E. Christopher M. (detail)
   
2014
Rewriting the history of an extinction – was a population of Steller's sea cows (Hydrodamalis gigas) at St. Lawrence Island also driven to extinction?
Biology Letters (Royal Society) 10: 20140878; 5 pp. 2 tabs. 2 figs. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2014.0878 Nov. 26, 2014.
–See also Pyenson et al. (2016); Crerar et al. (2016). For a correction to Table 1, see Biology Letters 12(5), May 1, 2016, doi:10.1098/rsbl.2016.0361.
 ABSTRACT: The Komandorskiye Islands population of Steller's sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) was extirpated ca. 1768 CE. Until now, Steller's sea cow was thought to be restricted in historic times to Bering and Copper Islands, Russia, with other records in the last millennium from the western Aleutian Islands. However, Steller's sea cow bone has been obtained by the authors from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, which is significantly farther north. Bone identity was verified using analysis of mitochondrial DNA. The nitrogen-15 (d15N)/carbon-13 (d13C) values for bone samples from St. Lawrence Island were significantly (p>0.05) different from Bering Island samples, indicating a second population. Bone samples were dated to between 1030 and 1150 BP (approx. 800–920 CE). The samples date from close to the beginning of the mediaeval warm period which could indicate that the population at St Lawrence Island was driven to extinction by climate change. A warming of the climate in the area may have changed the availability of kelp; alternatively or in addition, the animals may have been driven to extinction by the expansion of the Inuit from the Bering Strait region, possibly due to opening waterways, maybe following bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus), or searching for iron and copper. This study provides evidence for a previously unknown population of sea cows in the North Pacific within the past 1000 years and a second Steller's sea cow extirpation event in recent history.
 
 
De Iongh, Hendrik Huibert; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2014
The biological invasion of Sirenia into Australasia. Chap. 7 in: H. H. T. Prins and I. J. Gordon (eds.), Invasion biology and ecological theory: insights from a continent in transformation.
New York, Cambridge University Press (xiv + 528): 118-137. 3 figs.
 
 
Vélez-Juarbe, Jorge; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2014a
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. IX. Metaxytherium albifontanum, sp. nov.
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34(2): 444-464. 11 tabs. 15 figs. + supplemental online material. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02724634.2013.799072 Mar. 2014 (publ. online Mar. 4, 2014).
–ABSTRACT: We describe a new species of the halitheriine dugongid genus Metaxytherium from the late Oligocene of Florida and South Carolina. The new species is represented by cranial and postcranial material, including parts of the axial and appendicular skeleton. Metaxytherium albifontanum, sp. nov., differs from other species of Metaxytherium by the following unique combination of plesiomorphic and derived characters: posterior end of nasal process of premaxilla broad and flat relative to what is observed in most other members of the genus (somewhat resembling M. subapenninum); ventral extremity of jugal under posterior edge of orbit (character 85[1]) (shared with M. krahuletzi); exoccipitals separated in dorsal midline (character 66[1]) (shared with all other species in the genus, except some M. krahuletzi); and innominate with acetabulum (nearly lost or lost in M. crataegense, M. floridanum, M. serresii). This new species was sympatric with two dugongines, Crenatosiren olseni and Dioplotherium manigaulti. The small tusks and cranial morphology of M. albifontanum, sp. nov., indicate that it was likely a consumer of small seagrasses. Our phylogenetic analysis is consistent with previous ones in placing Hydrodamalinae within a paraphyletic Metaxytherium spp. and placing the Metaxytherium spp. + Hydrodamalinae clade as the sister group to Dugonginae. Metaxytherium albifontanum, sp. nov., is the oldest known member of its genus; this might indicate that the group originated in the West Atlantic and Caribbean region and later dispersed to the Old World Tethys region.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:7BFB3FB9-5622-4696-A1AA-8220FA2A12A5
 
 
Vélez-Juarbe, Jorge; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2014b
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region: X. Priscosiren atlantica, gen. et sp. nov.
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 34(4): 951-964. 4 tabs. 9 figs. July 2014 (publ. online July 8, 2014).
–ABSTRACT: We describe a new genus and species of early Oligocene halitheriine dugongid from the Western Atlantic region. Priscosiren atlantica, gen. et sp. nov., differs from all other halitheriine dugongids by displaying the following unique combination of characters: supraorbital processes dorsoventrally thin (?1 cm) with well-developed prominent posterolateral corner; supraoccipitals wider in the dorsal half than the ventral half; exoccipitals meeting dorsal to the foramen magnum; posttympanic process with a prominent anteroventral process for attachment of m. sternomastoideus; nasals separated in midline; ventral extremity of jugal located ventral to orbit; ventral border of mandible strongly concave; absence of accessory mental foramina; dorsoventrally broad horizontal ramus of mandible; loss of all permanent premolars; and concave anteroventral surface of jugal (a possible autapomorphy). Differs further from the similar species Caribosiren turneri in having lesser rostral deflection (of about 44°); presence of small incisors; lower temporal crests; and slightly larger body size. The relationship of Priscosiren with other dugongids places it close to being a structural as well as temporal ancestor to the Metaxytherium + Hydrodamalinae and Dugonginae clades. This supports previous assumptions of a Western Atlantic and Caribbean origin for these groups, and indicates that the halitheriine-dugongine divergence must have occurred no later than the earliest Oligocene. Priscosiren, Caribosiren, and Crenatosiren evidently coexisted in the West Atlantic–Caribbean region, and constitute yet another case of a uniquely patterned fossil sirenian multispecies community.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:D465CBCE-19AE-4E1D-A4EE-84443896C13B
x
 
Amson, Eli; Muizon, Christian de; Domning, Daryl Paul; Argot, Christine; Buffrénil, Vivian de (detail)
   
2015
Bone histology as a clue for resolving the puzzle of a dugong rib in the Pisco Formation, Peru.
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 35(3): e922981 (4 pp.) 2 figs. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2014.922981 May 2015 (publ. online Apr. 22, 2015).
–A supposedly dugongine rib described by Muizon & Domning (1985) and Domning & Aguilera (2008a) is reidentified as an aquatic sloth (Thalassocnus sp.).
 
 
Springer, Mark S.; Signore, Anthony V.; Paijmans, Johanna L. A.; Vélez-Juarbe, Jorge; Domning, Daryl Paul; Bauer, Cameron E.; He, Kai; Crerar, Lorelei D.; Campos, Paula F.; Murphy, William J.; Meredith, Robert W.; Gatesy, John; Willerslev, Eske; MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Hofreiter, Michael; Campbell, Kevin L. (detail)
   
2015
Interordinal gene capture, the phylogenetic position of Steller's sea cow based on molecular and morphological data, and the macroevolutionary history of Sirenia.
Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution 91: 178-193. 5 tabs. 5 figs. 9 tabs. in online Supplementary Material. DOI:10.1016/j.ympev.2015.05.022 Publ. online June 4, 2015.
–ABSTRACT: The recently extinct (ca. 1768) Steller's sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) was a large, edentulous North Pacific sirenian. The phylogenetic affinities of this taxon to other members of this clade, living and extinct, are uncertain based on previous morphological and molecular studies. We employed hybridization capture methods and second generation sequencing technology to obtain >30 kb of exon sequences from 26 nuclear genes for both H. gigas and Dugong dugon. We also obtained complete coding sequences for the tooth-related enamelin (ENAM) gene. Hybridization probes designed using dugong and manatee sequences were both highly effective in retrieving sequences from H. gigas (mean = 98.8% coverage), as were more divergent probes for regions of ENAM (99.0% coverage) that were designed exclusively from a proboscidean (African elephant) and a hyracoid (Cape hyrax). New sequences were combined with available sequences for representatives of all other afrotherian orders. We also expanded a previously published morphological matrix for living and fossil Sirenia by adding both new taxa and nine new postcranial characters. Maximum likelihood and parsimony analyses of the molecular data provide robust support for an association of H. gigas and D. dugon to the exclusion of living trichechids (manatees). Parsimony analyses of the morphological data also support the inclusion of H. gigas in Dugongidae with D. dugon and fossil dugongids. Timetree analyses based on calibration density approaches with hard- and soft-bounded constraints suggest that H. gigas and D. dugon diverged in the Oligocene and that crown sirenians last shared a common ancestor in the Eocene. The coding sequence for the ENAM gene in H. gigas does not contain frameshift mutations or stop codons, but there is a transversion mutation (AG to CG) in the acceptor splice site of intron 2. This disruption in the edentulous Steller's sea cow is consistent with previous studies that have documented inactivating mutations in tooth-specific loci of a variety of edentulous and enamelless vertebrates including birds, turtles, aardvarks, pangolins, xenarthrans, and baleen whales. Further, branch-site dN/dS analyses provide evidence for positive selection in ENAM on the stem dugongid branch where extensive tooth reduction occurred, followed by neutral evolution on the Hydrodamalis branch. Finally, we present a synthetic evolutionary tree for living and fossil sirenians showing several key innovations in the history of this clade including character state changes that parallel those that occurred in the evolutionary history of cetaceans.
 
 
Vélez-Juarbe, Jorge; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2015
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. XI. Callistosiren boriquensis, gen. et sp. nov.
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 35(1): e885034 (16 pp.). 4 tabs. 11 figs. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2014.885034 Jan. 2015 (publ. online Jan. 26, 2015).
–Spanish summ.
  ABSTRACT: Here we describe a new taxon of late Oligocene dugongine from the Western Atlantic and Caribbean region. Known from cranial and postcranial material, Callistosiren boriquensis, gen. et sp. nov., differs from other members of the group by displaying the following unique combination of characters: nasal process of premaxilla tapering but thickened; supraorbital process of frontal dorsoventrally thin (<2 cm) and well developed with recurved, bluntly pointed posterolateral corner; ventral rim of orbit not overhanging the lateral surface of the jugal; pterygoid fossa tall; tusks large, lozenge- or kite-shaped in cross-section, and with enamel confined to the medial side; lacrimals with thin, elongated dorsal process that is wedged between the premaxilla and frontal; and osteosclerotic but minimally pachyostotic ribs and vertebrae. A phylogenetic analysis places Callistosiren as one of the more basal members of the Dugonginae, but we note that the relationships and taxonomy of more derived members are in need of revision. Characters of the cranial morphology, such as the shape and size of the incisor tusks and the nature of the contact between the premaxilla and frontal, indicate that this new taxon may have fed preferentially on large species of seagrasses and their rhizomes. In addition, possession of osteosclerotic but minimally pachyostotic ribs and vertebrae is a unique feature unknown in other extinct dugongines and may indicate foraging behavior not known from other fossil sirenians.
  urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:E3FF5EB3-B54F-44DF-9528-FE9E2A353356
 
 
Abbassi, Nasrollah; Domning, Daryl Paul; Navidi Izad, Navid; Shakeri, Safoora (detail)
   
2016
Sirenia fossils from Qom Formation (Burdigalian) of the Kabudar Ahang area, northwest Iran.
Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia 122(1): 13-24. 1 tab. 6 figs. Mar. 1, 2016.
 
 
Crerar, Lorelei D.; Parsons, E. Christopher M.; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2016
Serendipity in research – investigation into illegal wildlife trade discovers a new population of Steller's sea cows: a reply to Pyenson et al. (2016).
Biology Letters (Royal Society) 12: 20150670; 2 pp. 1 tab. http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2015.0670 Feb. 3, 2016.
 
 
Crerar, Lorelei D.; Freeman, Elizabeth W.; Domning, Daryl Paul; Parsons, E. Christien M. (detail)
   
2017
Illegal trade of marine mammal bone exposed: simple test identifies bones of "mermaid ivory" or Steller's sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas).
Frontiers in Marine Science 3(272). 5 figs. 1 tab. DOI:10.3389/fmars.2016.00272. Jan. 6, 2017.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Heal, Geoffrey J.; Sorbi, Silvia (detail)
   
2017
Libysiren sickenbergi, gen. et sp. nov.: a new sirenian (Mammalia, Protosirenidae) from the middle Eocene of Libya.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 37(2): https://doi.org/10.1080/02724634.2017.1299158. 4 tabs. 16 figs. + online supplementary material. Published online Apr. 28, 2017.
–ABSTRACT: Fossil sirenian specimens collected in 1964 by the late R. J. G. Savage's expeditions in north-central Libya are described. They come from early middle Eocene (lower Lutetian, 47.8–43.6 Ma) deposits at the locality of Bu el Haderait and represent a new genus and species, Libysiren sickenbergi. This animal is the largest known protosirenid, and the largest Eocene sirenian known to date (condylobasal length >420 mm). Its dental formula was apparently 3.1.5.3, with five premolar loci as in all other Eocene sirenians, but the teeth are mostly not preserved. Its postcranial skeleton is unknown except for the atlas, a thoracic vertebra, and rib fragments. Stable isotopes indicate a mostly seagrass diet and a habitat of fully marine salinity. The Protosirenidae presently comprise the genera Protosiren, Ashokia, and Libysiren, with their interrelationships unresolved. Together, they are most parsimoniously regarded as a paraphyletic group basal to both Trichechidae and Dugongidae. However, as more of their morphology and diversity are revealed, they may prove to be more closely allied to the former and may shed crucial light on the still-mysterious origins of the trichechids (manatees).
 
 
Voss (Voß), Manja; Sorbi, Silvia; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2017
Morphological and systematic re-assessment of the late Oligocene "Halitherium" bellunense reveals a new crown group genus of Sirenia.
Acta Palaeontologica Polonica 62(1): 163-172. 2 tabs. 2 figs. Publ. online March 6, 2017.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2018
Fossil Sirenia (Mammalia) of the Miocene Chesapeake Group, Eastern United States. In S. J. Godfrey (ed.), The geology and vertebrate paleontology of Calvert Cliffs, Maryland, USA.
Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology No. 100: 241-265. 3 tabs. 9 figs.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul; Beatty, Brian Lee (detail)
   
2019
Fossil Sirenia of the West Atlantic and Caribbean region. XII. Stegosiren macei, gen. et sp. nov.
Jour. Vert. Pal. 39(3): e1650369 (13 pages). 3 tabs. 8 figs. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2019.1650369. "May 2019" (publ. online Sept. 13, 2019).
–ABSTRACT: Stegosiren macei, a new genus and species of halitheriine dugongid from the mid-Oligocene of South Carolina, U.S.A. (Ashley and Chandler Bridge formations, late Rupelian–late Chattian), represents a stage of halitheriine evolution more derived than that of the Old World early Oligocene Eosiren imenti and Halitherium schinzii, but slightly less derived than the West Atlantic late Oligocene Metaxytherium albifontanum. It is more comparable in stage of evolution to its early Oligocene contemporaries Caribosiren turneri and Priscosiren atlantica and may be a sister taxon of these two. It is distinguished autapomorphically from all other sirenians by a notably broadened frontal roof and a thickened anterior tip of the frontal, which formed a butt joint with the premaxilla. Analogous (independently evolved) joints in several other sirenians (principally dugongines) are correlated with enlarged upper tusks thought to be used for excavating seagrass rhizomes. This suggests that large tusks also may have been present (although not preserved) in Stegosiren, which is only the second halitheriine in which such a feature has been observed. Stegosiren macei brings to at least seven the number of potentially sympatric sirenian species lineages known from the West Atlantic-Caribbean Oligocene (six or more from South Carolina alone). This extraordinary sirenian diversity, unmatched elsewhere in the world, poses problems for ecomorphology and feeding-niche partitioning.
 
 
Samonds, Karen E.; Ernat, Rebekah A.; Andrianavalona, Tsiory; Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2019
New Miocene sirenians from Nosy Makamby, northwestern Madagascar.
Jour. Vert. Pal. e1570223 (15 pp.). DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2019.1570223. 1 tab. 8 figs. Publ. online Apr. 5, 2019.
–French summ.
 -ABSTRACT: The near lack of vertebrate fossils from the Cenozoic of Madagascar has left many of the details regarding the origin and evolution of the island's extant faunas unknown. However, recent fossil discoveries from Madagascar's nearshore marine deposits have begun to elucidate this mystery. These finds include sharks, bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, a middle Eocene sirenian (Eotheroides lambondrano), and the island's first fossil dolphin. We report here at least three (possibly four) different early (or possibly later) Miocene dugongid sirenians recovered from the island of Nosy Makamby, Mahajanga Basin, northwestern Madagascar. These include (1) a fragmentary braincase originally attributed to the genus Halitherium but here reidentified as a previously named species known only from Libya (Rytiodus heali; Dugonginae); (2) a newly named genus and species (Norosiren zazavavindrano) interpreted as a primitive relative of Xenosiren (Dugonginae); (3) a probable dugongine not yet identified with any known species; and (4) a taxon reported here as Metaxytherium cf. krahuletzi (Halitheriinae), the first Neogene halitheriine credibly reported from the Indian Ocean basin. This pattern of shallow marine environments harboring multispecies sirenian paleofaunas is seen elsewhere in the world, and these three or four contemporaneous sirenians represent the first glimpse into Madagascar's sea cow diversity during the Miocene. This specific time period is a poorly known and critical interval for interpreting Madagascar's past, and these specimens are potentially highly significant for reconstructing sirenian evolutionary and biogeographic history. Surprisingly, this sirenian fauna, so far, shares no genera with the roughly contemporaneous and relatively nearby one from Kutch, western India.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2021
Case 3829 – Halitherium Kaup, 1838 and Halitherium schinzii (Kaup, 1838) (Mammalia, Sirenia): proposed conservation of current usage by designation of a neotype for Halitherium schinzii.
Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature 78: 167-174. Dec. 30, 2021.
–ABSTRACT: The purpose of this application, under Article 75.5 of the Code, is to conserve the current usage of the generic name Halitherium Kaup, 1838 and the specifc name of its type species, Pugmeodon schinzii Kaup, 1838 (currently Halitherium schinzii), for a taxon of fossil sirenian from Europe by designating a neotype for this nominal species. This is in response to a recent contention that, as nomina dubia, these two names are inapplicable to the two sympatric species of this genus purported to occur around the type locality of H. schinzii in the Mainz Basin and elsewhere in Europe. The existing holotype is an isolated premolar that is not unambiguously determinable to species, but the name Halitherium schinzii has been used in a substantial body of literature extending over nearly two centuries, to the near exclusion of other names, and without taxonomic ambiguity because of reference to other specimens than the type. The desired ends can be attained without sacrifcing stability of nomenclature by designating the most suitable reference specimen as the neotype of Pugmeodon schinzii Kaup, 1838 under the plenary power and continuing to use the name Kaupitherium bronni (Krauss, 1858), with its own, different name-bearing type, for the other species.
 
 
Meshida, Keiko; Lin, Stephen; Domning, Daryl Paul; Wang, Paul; Gilland, Edwin (detail)
   
2021
The oblique extraocular muscles in cetaceans: Overall architecture and accessory insertions.
Journal of Anatomy 238(4): 917-941. 3 tabs. 8 figs. + online supplementary information. https://doi.org/10.1111/joa.13347 April 2021.
–ABSTRACT: The oblique extraocular muscles (EOMs) were dissected in 19 cetacean species and 10 non-cetacean mammalian species. Both superior oblique (SO) and inferior oblique (IO) muscles in cetaceans are well developed in comparison to out-groups and have unique anatomical features likely related to cetacean orbital configurations, swimming mechanics, and visual behaviors. Cetacean oblique muscles originate at skeletal locations typical for mammals: SO, from a common tendinous cone surrounding the optic nerve and from the medially adjacent bone surface at the orbital apex; IO, from the maxilla adjacent to lacrimal and frontal bones. However, because of the unusual orbital geometry in cetaceans, the paths and relations of SO and IO running toward their insertions onto the temporal ocular sclera are more elaborate than in humans and most other mammals. The proximal part of the SO extends from its origin at the apex along the dorsomedial aspect of the orbital contents to a strong fascial connection proximal to the preorbital process of the frontal bone, likely the cetacean homolog of the typical mammalian trochlea. However, the SO does not turn at this connection but continues onward, still a fleshy cylinder, until turning sharply as it passes through the external circular muscle (ECM) and parts of the palpebral belly of the superior rectus muscle. Upon departing this "functional trochlea" the SO forms a primary scle-ral insertion and multiple accessory insertions (AIs) onto adjacent EOM tendons and fascial structures. The primary SO scleral insertions are broad and muscular in most cetacean species examined, while in the mysticete minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus) the muscular SO bellies transition into broad fibrous tendons of insertion. The IO in cetaceans originates from an elongated fleshy attachment oriented laterally on the maxilla and continues laterally as a tubular belly before turning caudally at a sharp bend where it is constrained by the ECM and parts of the inferior rectus which form a functional trochlea as with the SO. The IO continues to a fleshy primary insertion on the temporal sclera but, as with SO, also has multiple AIs onto adjacent rectus tendons and connective tissue. The multiple IO insertions were particularly well developed in pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps), minke whale and fin whale. AIs of both SO and IO muscles onto multiple structures as seen in cetaceans have been described in humans and domesticated mammals.
  Also contains comparative data on the Florida manatee.
 
 
Souza, Érica Martinha Silva de; Freitas, Lucas; Ramos, Elisa Karen da Silva; Veiga, Giovanna Selleghin; Rachid-Ribeiro, Michelle Carneiro; Silva, Felipe André; Marmontel, Miriam; Santos, Fabrício Rodrigues dos; Laudisoit, Anne; Verheyen, Erik; Domning, Daryl Paul; Nery, Mariana Freitas (detail)
   
2021
The evolutionary history of manatees told by their mitogenomes.
Scientific Reports 11: 3564. 2 tabs. 5 figs. + online supplementary material. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82390-2
–ABSTRACT: The manatee family encompasses three extant congeneric species: Trichechus senegalensis (African manatee), T. inunguis (Amazonian manatee), and T. manatus (West Indian manatee). The fossil record for manatees is scant, and few phylogenetic studies have focused on their evolutionary history. We use full mitogenomes of all extant manatee species to infer the divergence dates and biogeographical histories of these species and the effect of natural selection on their mitogenomes. The complete mitochondrial genomes of T. inunguis (16,851 bp), T. senegalensis (16,882 bp), and T. manatus(16,882 bp), comprise 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes (rRNA - 12S and 16S), and 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNA), and (D-loop/CR). Our analyses show that the first split within Trichechus occurred during the Late Miocene (posterior mean 6.56 Ma and 95% HPD 3.81–10.66 Ma), followed by a iversifcation event in the Plio-Pleistocene (posterior mean 1.34 Ma, 95% HPD 0.1–4.23) in the clade composed by T. inunguis and T. manatus; T. senegalensis is the sister group of this clade with higher support values (pp> 0.90). The branch-site test identifed positive selection on T. inunguis in the 181st position of the ND4 amino acid gene (LRT= 6.06, p = 0.0069, BEB posterior probability = 0.96). The ND4 gene encodes one subunit of the NADH dehydrogenase complex, part of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. In conclusion, our results provide novel insight into the evolutionary history of the Trichechidae during the Late Miocene, which was influenced by geological events, such as Amazon Basin formation.
 
 
Domning, Daryl Paul (detail)
   
2022
What can we infer about the behavior of extinct sirenians? Chap. 1 in: H. Marsh (ed.), Ethology and Behavioral Ecology of Sirenia.
Springer Nature Switzerland: 1-17. 3 figs.
 
 
Meshida, Keiko; Lin, Stephen; Domning, Daryl Paul; Reidenberg, Joy S.; Wang, Paul C.; Gilland, Edwin (detail)
   
2022
The unique rectus extraocular muscles of cetaceans: Homologies and possible functions.
Jour. Anatomy 240(6): 1075-1094. https://doi.org/10.1111/joa.13628 Jan. 19, 2022.
–Includes comparisons with muscles of Trichechus manatus latirostris.

Daryl P. Domning, Research Associate, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560, and Laboratory of Evolutionary Biology, Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, D.C. 20059.
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